Replicate VM to vCloud Air using vSphere Replication


In my last post Disaster Recovery with vcloud Air we discussed what is vcloud Air Disaster Recovery service and saw how to prepare your infrastructure for replicating VM’s to Vcloud Air.

This post is continuation of my last post where I will be demonstrating how to replicate VM from on premise datacenter to vCloud Air. Let’s jump into action straightaway.

1: Login to your on-premise vSphere Web-Client and select the VM which you want to replicate, right click on it and chose All vSphere Replication Action > Configure Replication

Note: Make sure the VM which you want to replicate has HW version is less than 11 because VCA doesn’t support VM’s with HW v11 yet.

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2: Select “Replicate to a cloud provider” in the new window which popped up. Hit Next to continue.

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3: Select the target vDC in Cloud and make sure it shows as connected. Hit next to continue.

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4: Select the appropriate storage policy for the VM which you are replicating. vCloud Air provides two types of storage: Standard and SSD on the basis of what you have purchased.

Hit next to continue.

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5: If you are running a VM which is generating a lot of IOPS (like a DB server) or produces more transactions then it’s best to select Guest OS quiescing. Optionally you can select Enable network compression for VR data. This policy only works when you have vSphere 6 running on both sides. Hit Next to continue.

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6: Select the RPO settings for the VM. This setting determines how often a VM will be replicated to Cloud.

Note: First time when a VM is configured for replication, vSphere Replication is going to copy entire disk contents and will replicate it over the WAN link  to Cloud. This is known as “Initial full sync

For subsequent replications after that only the delta changes will be replicated to cloud.

You should plan your RTO settings carefully. the configured value of RPO settings is min 15 mins to max 24 hours

Choosing a value too low say for e.g 15 mins will produce overhead on your on prem infra as VM will be snapshotted time and again and delta changes will be replicated over your WAN link. Choosing this value too high say for e.g 8 hours, can cause you lose more data in event of catastrophic failure in your on premise datacenter.

So you have to analyze what type of VM you are going to replicate to cloud. You would like to chose low value of RTO for a VM which  is very business critical and which is writing data very frequently to disk. Such a VM can produce a huge amount of delta changes say just in an hour.

Hit Next to continue.

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7:  On ready to complete page review your settings and hit finish.

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8: Now Navigate to vSphere Replication page and click on Monitor tab to see the status of replication. It will show you various states of replication. The very first one which you would likely to see will be configuring replication.

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After a few minute the status will change to Initial Full Sync

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At the same time if you login to vcloud Air and navigate to your Org VDC, you will see the same status there as well

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At last you will see an OK status for your replicated VM. Which means that your VM has been replicated to cloud successfully.

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I hope you enjoyed reading this post. Feel free to share this on social media if it is worth sharing. Be sociable :)

 

About Alex Hunt

Hi All I am Manish Kumar Jha aka Alex Hunt. I am currently working in VMware Software India Pvt Ltd as Operations System Engineer (vCloud Air Operations). I have around 5 Years of IT experience and have exposure on VMware vSphere, vCloud Director, RHEL and modern data center technologies like Cisco UCS and Cisco Nexus 1000v and NSX. If you find any post informational to you please press like and share it across social media and leave your comments if you want to discuss further on any post. Disclaimer: All the information on this website is published in good faith and for general information purpose only. I don’t make any warranties about the completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. Any action you take upon the information you find on this blog is strictly at your own risk. The Views and opinions published on this blog are my own and not the opinions of my employer or any of the vendors of the product discussed.
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